Conference for Food Protection

2018 Biennial Meeting

Issue View | Council I | 2018 Scribe Packet

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Issue Number: Council I 004

Issue History

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Report-Clean In Place (CIP) Committee

Issue you would like the Conference to consider

At the 2016 biennial meeting a Clean in Place Committee was formed to expand on the work begun by the 2014 - 2016 Ice Maker Equipment Cleaning and Sanitizing Committee, but with a broader focus to include all food equipment known to have designs that depend upon clean in place processes for safety yet do not allow for easy inspection, cleaning and sanitizing access of its food contact surfaces.

The charges were:

1.Review applicable American National Standards Institute (ANSI) sanitation standards for clean in place processes with inaccessible food contact surfaces and ascertain their compatibility with Food Code definitions and recommendations;

2. Review current literature on scientific research of clean in place systems to ascertain relative food safety risk associated with improperly cleaned and/ or sanitized systems;

3. A Survey to determine the current prevalence and processes used to evaluate CIP Equipment during inspections; and

4. Report back to the 2018 CFP Biennial Meeting with recommendations.

Public Health Significance

With internal food contact surfaces of much equipment that is cleaned via CIP that cannot be inspected, a reasonable determination for when cleaning and sanitizing is needed cannot be made. The prevention of microbial growth in the form of biofilms, milk-stone and other soils on FOOD EQUIPMENT food contact surfaces of this type is not clearly defined by criteria based on scientific test data and presents a hazard to consumers.

Furthermore, current ANSI sanitation standards test brand new equipment only, before food contact surfaces become worn. There is no test to ensure that the design of ANSI sanitation listed equipment enables easy inspection, cleaning and sanitization of its food contact surfaces across the expected service life of the equipment. None of the ANSI sanitation standards provide any criteria for cleaning frequency or processes. Rather, this subject is left up to manufacturers to provide in their owners manuals and instructions for use.

Recommended Solution: The Conference recommends...

acknowledgment of the 2016-18 Clean in Place (CIP) Committee Report, with thanks to the members of the Committee for their work, and dissolution of the CIP committee.

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